"

They say I have a sweet ass, nice tits, a real pretty dress. They say I’m their future wife, or I’d look good with their dick in my mouth. They try (and probably succeed at times) to take pictures down my shirt. They ask if they can get my number, they ask where I live, why I’m not smiling, why my boyfriend lets me walk around by myself. Then they ask why I’m such a bitch, if my pussy is made of ice. They say that they never do this, as though I’ve somehow driven them to inappropriate behavior and deserve it. They say they’re just having fun, trying to pay me a compliment. Pretty frequently they get mean, slipping into a loud tourettes-like chant of bitch-whore-cunt-slut.


Before you try to tell me that it’s because I take my clothes off for a living, let me tell you that this started way before I was 18. Let me tell you that every single woman I know has at least one truly terrifying story of street harassment and a whole bunch of other stories that are merely insulting or annoying. Let me remind you that in a room of pornography fans, who have actually seen me with a dick in my mouth and who can buy a replica of my vagina in a can or box, I am treated with far more respect than I am walking down the street.

"

— Stoya (via losingsightofsaturn)

(via cwnerd12)

"Nobody should be forced to choose between defending investigative journalism and freedom of speech and fighting for justice in the global war on women’s bodies."

Laurie Penny, in a piece of commentary for the Independent, every word of which is worth reading at least twice. 

Can I get a t-shirt with this on it? 

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

This covers all my feelings about the Julian Assange saga and is a very good read

-naomi

(via rookiemag)

(via rookiemag)

kateordie:

Sometimes I have the time and patience to get from an idea to a fully fleshed-out, penciled, inked and coloured comic.

Sometimes I don’t.

(via clairethecrazycatlady)

projectunbreakable:






Grace, I wanted to write to tell you how grateful I am for the opportunity to participate in Project Unbreakable and talk with you and Yvonne and everyone on your crew who’s helping you with this project. That day, I focused on “What can I give back about my experiences being raped, to this community of men and women, and this outpouring of reality that has helped me come to terms with being a survivor of sexual abuse. A survivor. Not a victim.” There are a lot of things I didn’t say, that I couldn’t say at the time about what my abuser would tell me that was all designed and aimed at normalizing the sexual abuse. Like I’d asked for it. Like he was doing me a favor. Always framed in a way that, even though I was begging for the abuse to stop, I felt ashamed and responsible, because at 14, I could never find a form of “No,” that he would listen to. “I like the idea that when you’re old enough to date, you’ll be ahead of all the boys.” “I am a sex god.” “You’re a natural at this.” “I wish you visited more often… I don’t recognize your clothes anymore.” Instead of focusing on my abuser, I focused on how my family responded to the abuse, because so much of the fear of the stigma of sexual abuse is related to what others will say when you tell them you were raped. And that fear and shame is what keeps survivors from disclosing. The amazing thing about Project Unbreakable is you and everyone you photograph are creating a community where it’s safe to disclose — not just to safe friends, but disclose to our culture at large. Because you are giving survivors a forum to speak and creating this compendium of the uncomfortable reality of abuse, you are also giving everyone else a glimpse into the fundamental nature of sexual abuse and the the overwhelming prevalence of rape in our culture. The national dialog about rape and what the average person knows about the kind of people rape, or what rape even looks like, is abysmal — and I think it’s abysmal because of honest ignorance. No one enjoys difficult topics, so they turn a blind eye. But one photograph at a time, one survivor at a time, Project Unbreakable is changing that. The “Old Way” built this wall of silence and stigma around sexual abuse, so every survivor suffered alone. Project Unbreakable is changing that. You’re bringing us together. When I first saw Project Unbreakable, my stomach dropped and I thought, “Oh God, I’m not the only one.” And, months later, when I picked up a marker to expose what I’d been through, it hurt so much that I thought I might die. But I survived. And since then, for the first time in 16 years, I feel entirely like myself.  Nothing anyone says to me, ever again, can ever take that away. Thank you so much. Please take care.
—
Photographed in Boston, MA on April 25th.
—
Not sure what Project Unbreakable is? Click here.
Want to be a part of Project Unbreakable? Email us at projectunbreakable@gmail.com
—
Find us on Facebook & Twitter
View submissions here

projectunbreakable:

Grace,

I wanted to write to tell you how grateful I am for the opportunity to
participate in Project Unbreakable and talk with you and Yvonne and
everyone on your crew who’s helping you with this project.

That day, I focused on “What can I give back about my experiences
being raped, to this community of men and women, and this outpouring
of reality that has helped me come to terms with being a survivor of
sexual abuse. A survivor. Not a victim.”

There are a lot of things I didn’t say, that I couldn’t say at the
time about what my abuser would tell me that was all designed and
aimed at normalizing the sexual abuse. Like I’d asked for it. Like he
was doing me a favor. Always framed in a way that, even though I was
begging for the abuse to stop, I felt ashamed and responsible, because
at 14, I could never find a form of “No,” that he would listen to.

“I like the idea that when you’re old enough to date, you’ll be ahead
of all the boys.”

“I am a sex god.”

“You’re a natural at this.”

“I wish you visited more often… I don’t recognize your clothes anymore.”

Instead of focusing on my abuser, I focused on how my family responded
to the abuse, because so much of the fear of the stigma of sexual
abuse is related to what others will say when you tell them you were
raped. And that fear and shame is what keeps survivors from
disclosing. The amazing thing about Project Unbreakable is you and
everyone you photograph are creating a community where it’s safe to
disclose — not just to safe friends, but disclose to our culture at
large. Because you are giving survivors a forum to speak and creating
this compendium of the uncomfortable reality of abuse, you are also
giving everyone else a glimpse into the fundamental nature of sexual
abuse and the the overwhelming prevalence of rape in our culture. The
national dialog about rape and what the average person knows about the
kind of people rape, or what rape even looks like, is abysmal — and I
think it’s abysmal because of honest ignorance. No one enjoys
difficult topics, so they turn a blind eye. But one photograph at a
time, one survivor at a time, Project Unbreakable is changing that.
The “Old Way” built this wall of silence and stigma around sexual
abuse, so every survivor suffered alone. Project Unbreakable is
changing that. You’re bringing us together.

When I first saw Project Unbreakable, my stomach dropped and I
thought, “Oh God, I’m not the only one.” And, months later, when I
picked up a marker to expose what I’d been through, it hurt so much
that I thought I might die. But I survived. And since then, for the
first time in 16 years, I feel entirely like myself.  Nothing anyone
says to me, ever again, can ever take that away.

Thank you so much.

Please take care.

Photographed in Boston, MA on April 25th.

Not sure what Project Unbreakable is? Click here.

Want to be a part of Project Unbreakable? Email us at projectunbreakable@gmail.com

Find us on Facebook & Twitter

View submissions here

"Not being assaulted is not a privilege to be earned through the judicious application of personal safety strategies. A woman should be able to walk down the street at 4 in the morning in nothing but her socks, blind drunk, without being assaulted, and I, for one, am not going to do anything to imply that she is in any way responsible for her own assault if she fails to Adequately Protect Herself. Men aren’t helpless dick-driven maniacs who can’t help raping a vulnerable woman. It disrespects EVERYONE."

Emily Nagoski.  (via rapeisnotajoke)

(via hattiesnothereanymore-deactivat)