idlesuperstar:

She’s got a sense of humour too - one wouldn’t be dull - one would wake up and there’d be a whole day for jolly things to happen in - and then one would come home and go to bed - that would be jolly, too - and while she was writing, I could go out and mess round, so we shouldn’t either of us be dull - 

I am so deeply in love with Sayers, Peter, and Harriet.

Placet.

(via junomarlowe)

To me, they are perfect. <3

To me, they are perfect. <3

(Source: mrv3000, via madamedarque)

smokeandsong:

andrezel:

The Hall was very full; Harriet’s gowned shoulder touched her companion’s, and the crescent of his long sleeve lay over her knee. He was wrapt in the motionless austerity with which all genuine musicians listen to genuine music. Harriet was musician enough to…


“That’s right, laugh! I did kill my pride—but, oh, Peter! it had a lovely death.”

“That’s right, laugh! I did kill my pride—but, oh, Peter! it had a lovely death.”

(via harrietvane)

"I could not marry Peter off to the young woman he had (in the conventional Perseus manner) rescued from death and infamy, because I could find no form of words in which she could accept him without loss of self-respect. I had landed my two chief puppets in a situation where, according to all the conventional rules of detective fiction, they should have had nothing to do but fall into one another’s arms; but they would not do it, and that for a very good reason. When I looked at the situation I saw that it was in every respect false and degrading; and the puppets had somehow got just so much flesh and blood in them that I could not force them to accept it without shocking myself. […] Harriet had been a human being from the start, and I had humanized Peter for her benefit; but the situation between them had become still more impossible on that account."

— Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night, from Howard Maycraft’s Art of the Detective Story (via smokeandsong)

(via sangfroidwoolf)

Perfect casting is perfect.

(Source: fuckyeahharrietwalter, via sangfroidwoolf)

"“If anybody ever marries you, it will be for the pleasure of hearing you talk piffle,” said Harriet severely"

Strong Poison, Dorothy L. Sayers (via joan-webster)

(via sangfroidwoolf)

missanthropicprinciple:

Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane and Edward Petherbridge as Lord Peter Wimsey.

missanthropicprinciple:

Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane and Edward Petherbridge as Lord Peter Wimsey.

missanthropicprinciple:

RADIO TIMES: 21-27 March 1987 | The Dorothy Sayers Mysteries

missanthropicprinciple:

A match made in heaven.

I completely agree. &lt;3

missanthropicprinciple:

A match made in heaven.

I completely agree. <3

"‘How can I find the words? Poets have taken them all, and left me with nothing to say or do -‘
‘Except to teach me for the first time what they meant,’"

Busman’s Honeymoon, Dorothy L Sayers (via breadforsong)

Ohhhh, these two. 

(via hattiesnothereanymore-deactivat)

breadforsong:

“I freely admit,” said Wimsey, “That it’s the queerest case I ever struck. We’ve got all the evidence - of an elaborate conspiracy to do something or other, and we’ve got a corpse which looks like the victim of the conspiracy to murder. But when we put the two together, they don’t fit. Everything in the garden is lovely except the melancholy fact that none of the people engaged in the conspiracy could possibly have done the murder. Harriet! It’s your business to work out problems of this sort - how do you propose we tackle this one?”
“I don’t know,” said Harriet. “I can only suggest a few methods and precedents. There’s the Roger Sheringham method, for instance. You prove elaborately and in detail that A did the murder; then you give the story one final shake, twist it round a fresh corner and find that the real murderer is B - the person you suspected first and then lost sight of.”
“That’s no good; the cases aren’t parallel. We can’t even plausibly fix anything on A, let alone B.”
“No; well, there’s the Philo Vance method. You shake your head and say ‘There’s worse yet to come,’ and then the murderer kills five more people, and that thins the suspects out a bit and you spot who it is.”
“Wasteful, wasteful,” said Wimsey. “And too slow.”
“True. There’s the Inspector French method - you break the unbreakable alibi.”
Wimsey groaned
“If anybody says ‘Alibi’ to me again, I’ll- I’ll-“
“All right. There are plenty of methods left. There’s the Thorndyke type of solution, which, as Thorndyke himself says, can be put in a nut-shell. ‘You have got the wrong man, you have got the wrong box, and yiou have got the wrong body.’ Suppose, for instance, that Paul Alexis is really-“
“The Emperor of Japan! Thank you.”

By posting some Sayers goodness, you have just made my day. :) Harriet & Peter forever!! <3

(via hattiesnothereanymore-deactivat)