fuckyeahharrietwalter:

The extraordinary story of how the 19-year-old Mary Shelley created Frankenstein, one of the world’s most terrifying monsters.

A show about one of my favourite novels that features Harriet Walter playing the legendary Mary Wollstonecraft = one incredibly happy me.

"My own sex, I hope, will excuse me, if I treat them like rational creatures, instead of flattering their fascinating graces, and viewing them as if they were in a state of perpetual childhood, unable to stand alone."

— Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women (via classiestofbroads)

(Source: queensnakehole)

"Taught from infancy that beauty is woman’s sceptre, the mind shapes itself to the body, and roaming round its gilt cage, only seeks to adorn its prison."

— Happy birthday, Mary Wollstonecraft! (via evelyn-carnahan)

"In fact, it is a farce to call any being virtuous whose virtues do not result from the exercise of its own reason."

— Mary Wollstonecraft - A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (via megthemountain)

"Let not men then in the pride of power, use the same arguments that tyrannic kings and venal ministers have used, and fallaciously assert that woman ought to be subjected because she has always been so. -But, when man, governed by reasonable laws, enjoys his natural freedom, let him despise woman, if she do not share it with him; and, till that glorious period arrives, in descanting on the folly of the sex, let him not overlook his own."

— Mary Wollstonecraft (via illsignyourcast)

(Source: bornceaselessly)

"Travellers who require every nation should resemble their own country, had better stay at home."

— Mary Wollstonecraft - A Short Residence in Sweden
(via incoherentloathing)

"

What were the outrages of a day to these continual miseries? Let those sorrows hide their diminished head before the tremendous mountain of woe that thus defaces our globe! Man preys on man; and you mourn for the idle tapestry that decorated a gothic pile, and the dronish bell that summoned the fat priest to prayer. You mourn for the empty pageant of a name, when slavery flaps her wing, and the sick heart retires to die in lonely wilds, far from the abodes of men. Did the pangs you felt for insulted nobility, the anguish that rent your heart when the gorgeous robes were torn off the idol human weakness had set up, deserve to be compared with the long-drawn sigh of melancholy reflection, when misery and vice are thus seen to haunt our steps, and swim on the top of every cheering prospect? Why is our fancy to be appalled by terrific perspectives of a hell beyond the grave?–Hell stalks abroad;–the lash resounds on the slave’s naked sides; and the sick wretch, who can no longer earn the sour bread of unremitting labour, steals to a ditch to bid the world a long good night–or, neglected in some ostentatious hospital, breathes his last amidst the laugh of mercenary attendants.

Such misery demands more than tears–I pause to recollect myself; and smother the contempt I feel rising for your rhetorical flourishes and infantine sensibility.

"

Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Man, bashing Edmund Burke for feeling more sorrow for poor Marie Antoinette than all those oppressed Frenchmen.

#fuckyeahmarywollstonecraft

(via wellmanicuredman)

Oh God, Mary Wollstonecraft was just so frickin’ brilliant and inspiring. 

"Now by these presents let me assure you that you are not only in my heart, but my veins, this morning. I turn from you half-abashed—yet you haunt me, and some look, word or touch thrills through my whole frame…. When the heart and reason accord there is no flying from voluptuous sensations, do what a woman can."

— Mary Wollstonecraft (via caseydeann)

(via caseydeann-deactivated20130218)

"

I would have liked to have dined with you today, after finishing your essay - that my eyes, and lips, I do not exactly mean my voice, might have told you that they had raised you in my esteem. What a cold word! I would say love, if you will promise not to dispute about its propriety, when I want to express an increasing affection, founded on a more intimate acquaintance with your heart and understanding.

I shall cork up all my kindness - yet the fine volatile essence may fly off in my walk - you know not how much tenderness for you may escape in a voluptuous sigh, should the air, as is often the case, give a pleasurable movement to the sensations, that have been clustering round my heart, as I read this morning - reminding myself, every now and then, that the writer loved me.

Voluptuous is often expressive of a meaning I do not now intend to give, I would describe one of those moments, when the senses are exactly tuned by the ringing tenderness of the heart and according reason entices you to live in the present moment, regardless of the past or future - it is not rapture - it is sublime tranquility.

I have felt it in your arms - hush! Let not the light see, I was going to say hear it - these confessions should only be uttered - you know where, when the curtains are up - and all the world shut out - Ah me!

I wish I may find you at home when I carry this letter to drop it in the box, - that I may drop a kiss with it into your heart, to be embalmed, till me meet, closer.

"

Mary Wollstonecraft, Anglo-Irish feminist and writer, to William Godwin, philosopher and writer. (October 4, 1796)

(Source: lilclur)

"England and America owe their liberty to commerce, which created new species of power to undermine the feudal system. But let them beware of the consequence; the tyranny of wealth is still more galling and debasing than that of rank."

— Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft - Letters on Sweden, Norway, and DenmarkLetters on Sweden, Norway, and Denmark
(via Jacomijn Hendrickx)

(Source: kindlequotes)

"I lament that women are systematically degraded by receiving the trivial attentions which men think it manly to pay to the sex, when in fact they are insultingly supporting their own superiority."

— Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792)

(Source: feministquotes)

"Taught from infancy that beauty is woman’s sceptre, the mind shapes itself to the body, and roaming round its gilt cage, only seeks to adorn its prison."

— Mary Wollstonecraft (via glasswalrus)

"I do not wish [women] to have power over men; but over themselves."

Mary Wollstonecraft (via riverscollide)

EXACTLY.

"My own sex, I hope, will excuse me, if I treat them like rational creatures, instead of flattering their fascinating graces, and viewing them as if they were in a state of perpetual childhood, unable to stand alone. I earnestly wish to point out in what true dignity and human happiness consists. I wish to persuade women to endeavour to acquire strength, both of mind and body, and to convince them that the soft phrases, susceptibility of heart, delicacy of sentiment, and refinement of taste, are almost synonymous with epithets of weakness, and that those beings who are only the objects of pity, and that kind of love which has been termed its sister, will soon become objects of contempt."

— MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT, A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN (via easyspeakeasy)

(Source: domdeluwhiskey)